A: 3rd Sunday of Lent A: Christmas A: Holy Family A: The Baptism of the Lord A: 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 3rd Sunday of Easter A: 4th Sunday of Easter A: 5th Sunday of Easter A: 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 20th Sunday of Ordinary Time A: 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time A: Pentecost A: The Most Holy Trinity A: The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ A: 9th Sunday of Ordinary Time A: 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: Palm Sunday A: Easter Sunday A: 6th Sunday of Easter A: Ascension of the Lord A: 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 1st Sunday of Advent A: 2nd Sunday of Easter A: 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 1st Sunday of Lent A: 2nd Sunday of Lent A: The Solemnity of Christ the King A: 4th Sunday of Advent A: 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 2nd Sunday of Advent A: 3rd Sunday of Advent A: 5th Sunday of Lent A: Epiphany A: 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time A: 4th Sunday of Lent A: 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time

A: 4th Sunday of Easter

Praying For a Shepherd

April 16-17, 2005

John 10: 1-10

We live in historic times.  This week the cardinals of our church will be gathered in Rome to elect a new pope.  For over a quarter of a century, we as a church have been led by the ministry of John Paul II.  But this week there will be a new pope, and a new era in the church life will begin.

It is very appropriate then that this Sunday in our gospel, we are presented with this image of Christ as the shepherd, as the gate to the sheep.  This image reveals Christ’s care for us and his activity.  The shepherd cares for the sheep.  He is not a thief or a bandit.  Moreover, the shepherd is active.  He calls the sheep by name; they come out and follow him.  This image of Christ is something to anchor us this week, because it is important for us to believe that Christ is the shepherd of the church and that Christ will be active as the new pope is chosen.  After all, if we do not believe that Christ will be active in this process of choosing the successor of St. Peter, in what action do we expect him to be active?

All of us probably have our own personal ideas and desires for a new pope.  I believe that it is important for us to communicate those ideas and hopes to our shepherd.  We should all spend some time in prayer today, telling Christ what we believe the needs of the church are and what the qualities of the new successor to Peter should be.  The gospel emphasizes the close connection between Jesus and his sheep.  They recognize his voice; he calls them each by name.  Therefore, it is not only appropriate, but imperative, for us to believe that our prayers, our desires, our hopes for the church are something that our shepherd wants to hear.

Spend some time in prayer today, communicating your vision and your need to our shepherd.  Here is what I have been praying. I pray for a pope who will share the same energy and vision of John Paul II, someone who will be able as effectively to be a focus and symbol of the Catholic church in the world, someone who could carry on the tradition of moral integrity and authority which our past pope demonstrated to so many throughout the world.  I am also praying for a pope that has a pastoral heart, a pope that is not only connected to the mechanics of the church, but understands the needs of the people throughout the world, a pope who realizes how many people struggle with faith and doubt and the troubles in their life and the need for the church to be present to them in times of difficulty.  I pray for a pope who realizes how important it is that we continue the work of John Paul II in relating to the other great religions of our world, to the Jewish people, to the Moslems, to all people of good faith.  I pray for a pope who will respect the ministry of his fellow bishops.  The church a worldwide community. The needs vary from diocese to diocese.  I am praying for a pope who will allow local bishops more flexibility in dealing with the particular issues of their dioceses.  I am also praying for a pope who will honestly read the signs of the times in our world and prepare the church to address them.  Not least among those issues is the issue of the tremendous shortage of priests in the United States and in many other church communities throughout the world.

That is what I am praying.  But I am only one sheep.  Our shepherd needs to hear from all of us, and it is important for all of us to express our desires, our perceptions of the needs of the church to the shepherd, because of our relationship to him. So the first thing I would recommend that we all do today and throughout this week is pray.  The second thing that I would recommend is that we trust, that we believe that Christ our shepherd will be active.  You have already read in the newspaper all the leading candidates for pope and all the analysis of their strengths and weaknesses.  You can be sure that when a new pope is chosen, the media will cover us with a deluge of details and analysis of who he is, what he believes, what he will do or not do, which part of the church won, which part of the church lost, in this election.  I think it would be wise to realize that much of what you read will be wrong.  Even to the extent that it is right, history has proven that people who assume the See of Peter often revise their thinking, often change in their attitude and approach when they are given the responsibility to lead the church.

So as the new pope is chosen, I think we should be slow to judge and quick to trust.  To trust and believe that Christ was involved in this election and that this man bears a gift, a direction that will help our church.  We live in historic times.  This week it important for us to claim our relationship to Christ the shepherd, to pray that he might know what we need and desire from our own lips, to trust and believe that he will be active in the upcoming days.  Prayer and trust are the two qualities we should bring as we begin this historic week in the life of our church.

 

Re-imagining Sheep

April 13, 2008

John 10:1-10

Today is the fourth Sunday of Easter. It is sometimes called “Good Shepherd Sunday.” That is because in all three cycles of the Liturgical Year, the Gospel presents us with an image of Jesus as the shepherd and we as the sheep. Now preaching on this Sunday has its own challenges. This was driven home to me several years ago when after preaching on this Sunday, a parishioner came into the sacristy with a criticism. He said, “I know it’s scriptural and all that, but I don’t like being compared to a sheep. Sheep are dumb animals. They have very little initiative or energy, and they are easily led around by whoever would want to manipulate them. Is this image of being a sheep really a useful image for a disciple in the twenty-first century?” I thought that the criticism made a good point and so every year after that on “Good Shepherd Sunday,” I have been keenly aware of the limitations of the sheep as an example of discipleship.

That’s why it was good last week that I read an article in the newspaper about sheep farmers. Each year United States sheep farmers bring in sheep shearers from Australia or New Zealand remove the wool from the sheep. But because of the present weakness of the American dollar, fewer and fewer sheep shearers have been willing to come to the United States. Therefore, the farmers have begun to train Americans to shear the sheep. The newspaper interviewed a number of the trainees who insisted that the traditional image of the sheep as being peaceful and docile is way overblown. Sheep will indeed, allow you to shear them but only if you know what you are doing, only if they trust you. If they do not trust you, they will assert themselves and run away. And when a hundred pound sheep makes a decision to run away, it takes a great deal of experience and muscle to hold them where you want them.

Now I thought that this new information might be used to enlarge and deepen the traditional image of sheep. We might begin to see them not only as peaceful and docile but also as assertive and strong. These two qualities together might indeed provide a very useful image for discipleship in the twenty-first century.

We are called by Christ to be disciples who are not only peaceful but also assertive, not only docile but also strong. Our call to peace comes directly from the scriptures. Peace characterizes God’s kingdom. Isaiah dreams of the day when the swords will be beaten into plowshares, and Jesus promises us a peace that the world cannot give. So as followers of Christ, we must be people of peace. We must be people opposed to violence. Indeed, we must understand that although choosing violence appears to deliver what we want, it instead contributes to a cycle which can destroy us. This is true both culturally and personally. Every time we as a nation use our military might to bend another nation to our will, instead of using dialogue and negotiation, we choose an option contrary to the kingdom of God. Every time we support a social solution based on violence, whether that be the violence of abortion or the violence of capital punishment, we take a step contrary to what God intends. Every time that we take an option personally to act out of anger or vengeance, every time we use our position or authority in the workplace or home to coerce someone to do what we want them to do, we show that we are not acting as Christ’s disciples. Violence is not the answer. We must be people of peace.

But at the same time, we must be people of strength. The gospel does not call us to be wallflowers or doormats. We are not doing Christ’s will when we avoid taking a stand against evil and injustice. We are not being faithful disciples when we accept the manipulations of our world, the imperfections of our government, the flaws of our culture. We are not following the gospel when we accept abuse in our workplace or in our home, imagining that such acts of violence are acceptable—or, even worse, something which we deserve. It is part of our mission to oppose evil, to assert ourselves against those forces which can harm us and harm the people we love.

So if Christ is the shepherd and we are the sheep, it is important to know what a sheep is: a peaceful animal but one who is willing to assert itself against the evil which surrounds it. We are called to be people of peace but also people of strength, willing to commit ourselves in non-violent ways to oppose the evil of the world, willing to stand against violence even as we take steps to protect ourselves and our families. Now this mixture of peacefulness and strength is an uncommon and delicate balance. But it is the balance of the gospel. And we who are called to follow the shepherd commit ourselves to find that balance and to live it in our lives.

 

 

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